Free Heroes Of The Odyssey And Aeneid Essay Sample

Type of paper: Essay

Topic: Aeneas, Hero, The Odyssey, Odysseus, Men, Party, Tourism, Journey

Pages: 2

Words: 550

Published: 2020/12/15

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Following the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines

Abstract
Heroes come in many forms. Some are brave, while others are obedient. Some are smart, while others are trained. In fact, some heroes do not seem to be heroes at all. There are many stories that contain heroes who, upon first sight, appear to be the villain. Odysseus and Aeneas exhibit several different characteristics for heroism, and some for villainy as well. They are brave, smart, cunning, and loyal. One appears more heroic than the other, based on his story and the circumstances surrounding his journey. However, both men can be considered heroes in their own right if all factors are taken into account. What makes a hero is a complicated question. There are many ways to become a hero. Following orders, showing bravery, and doing what must be done are a few ways to become a hero. Understanding that a situation is sometimes out of your hands is also a way to become a hero. The characters in “The Odyssey,” and “The Aeneid,” exemplify these characteristics, as well as others that make them heroes. They are both brave, and do what needs to be done when it needs to be done. Odysseus takes responsibility for his actions and attempts to lead his men out of harm’s way. Aeneas, though stricken by love, also does what he must even though he does not want to. Therefore, both of the men can be called heroes. Odysseus and Aeneas are very different heroes. Odysseus is a more traditional hero, who has a task put before him, though he must overcome obstacles to achieve it. Aeneas also is a hero with obstacles, though he and other parties were more manipulated during his endeavors. It would be easier to paint Aeneas in a false light because Dido was hurt as he left, but this should not matter. Both men were heroes in their own right.
What makes a hero is a complicated question. There are many ways to become a hero. Following orders, showing bravery, and doing what must be done are a few ways to become a hero. Understanding that a situation is sometimes out of your hands is also a way to become a hero. The characters in “The Odyssey,” and “The Aeneid,” exemplify these characteristics, as well as others that make them heroes.
Odysseus could be named a hero for several reasons. He is steadfast, for example. When his men become intoxicated by the fruit in the land of the Lotus-eaters, refusing to leave, Odysseus remembers they must stay the course . He drags his men back to the boat to finish the journey. Furthering their journey, Odysseus and his men sail to the land of Cyclopes. After lingering in a cave for too long, the party comes face-to-face with a Cyclops. This happens because of Odysseus, but because he is a true leader, he stays, attempting to save his men. Polyphemus, son of Poseidon, eats two of Odysseus’ party before, imprisoning the remaining before they can escape . Odysseus refuses to give up, however, showing the mark of a true hero. Knowing the Cyclops is too strong to defeat through force, he uses his wit to defeat the brute, saving the remainder of his men, and blinding Polyphemus in the process.
Throughout his journey in book nine, Odysseus shows that being a hero means taking control of a situation. However, it also means taking responsibility for your actions and attempting to correct them. Odysseus lingered in the Cyclops’ cave for two long, resulting in two of his men being eaten, and their party being captured. Rather than give up, he rallied his men, outwitted the Cyclops, and blinded him in order to get the party home. He proved himself a true hero.
Aeneas is the story of a different kind of hero. While Odysseus has a specific journey laid out for him, and both men are tested, Aeneas is tested for different reasons, and manipulated by a third party. Not only that, but the actions of Juno and Cupid effect more than Aeneas and his men; Dido is also deeply affected by the manipulation. Essentially, Aeneas and Dido are manipulated into loving one another during a storm. Once Mercury finds out Aeneas may be neglecting his typical duties, he immediately demands the war veteran leave at once for battle. Aeneas, befuddled by Cupid’s spell, does not want to leave Dido, and instead tries to leave in secret. Of course, Dido knows and confronts Aeneas, causing him to confess he leaves not of his own accord . In the end, devastation overtakes Dido, and she kills herself as Aeneas sails toward his destiny.
It would be easy to paint Aeneas as an anti-hero, or even a villain, because a young woman gets her heart broken in the end. However, we would have to neglect the fact that gods, as well as cupid, manufactured the tender emotions felt by both parties. Fundamentally, the love was not real, perhaps explaining why Dido’s reaction to Aeneas’ departure was so explosive. Aeneas is a hero for several reasons, then. Firstly, he understood what he needed to do, and was willing to leave Dido despite the fact that he did not want to. Secondly, he attempted to do so without hurting her. Thirdly, he was honest with her when he was confronted. Finally, what made Aeneas most heroic is the simple act that Aeneas sails toward battle at Mercury’s instruction, despite Dido’s death.
In sum, there are many ways to be a hero. Odysseus and Aeneas are very different heroes. Odysseus is a more traditional hero, who has a task put before him, though he must overcome obstacles to achieve it. Aeneas also is a hero with obstacles, though he and other parties were more manipulated during his endeavors. It would be easier to paint Aeneas in a false light because Dido was hurt as he left, but this should not matter. Both men were heroes in their own right.

Reference

Homer. The Odyssey. New York: Penguin Classics, 1997.
Virgil. The Aeneid. New York: Penguin Classics, 2010.

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WePapers. (2020, December, 15) Free Heroes Of The Odyssey And Aeneid Essay Sample. Retrieved December 01, 2021, from https://www.wepapers.com/samples/free-heroes-of-the-odyssey-and-aeneid-essay-sample/
"Free Heroes Of The Odyssey And Aeneid Essay Sample." WePapers, 15 Dec. 2020, https://www.wepapers.com/samples/free-heroes-of-the-odyssey-and-aeneid-essay-sample/. Accessed 01 December 2021.
WePapers. 2020. Free Heroes Of The Odyssey And Aeneid Essay Sample., viewed December 01 2021, <https://www.wepapers.com/samples/free-heroes-of-the-odyssey-and-aeneid-essay-sample/>
WePapers. Free Heroes Of The Odyssey And Aeneid Essay Sample. [Internet]. December 2020. [Accessed December 01, 2021]. Available from: https://www.wepapers.com/samples/free-heroes-of-the-odyssey-and-aeneid-essay-sample/
"Free Heroes Of The Odyssey And Aeneid Essay Sample." WePapers, Dec 15, 2020. Accessed December 01, 2021. https://www.wepapers.com/samples/free-heroes-of-the-odyssey-and-aeneid-essay-sample/
WePapers. 2020. "Free Heroes Of The Odyssey And Aeneid Essay Sample." Free Essay Examples - WePapers.com. Retrieved December 01, 2021. (https://www.wepapers.com/samples/free-heroes-of-the-odyssey-and-aeneid-essay-sample/).
"Free Heroes Of The Odyssey And Aeneid Essay Sample," Free Essay Examples - WePapers.com, 15-Dec-2020. [Online]. Available: https://www.wepapers.com/samples/free-heroes-of-the-odyssey-and-aeneid-essay-sample/. [Accessed: 01-Dec-2021].
Free Heroes Of The Odyssey And Aeneid Essay Sample. Free Essay Examples - WePapers.com. https://www.wepapers.com/samples/free-heroes-of-the-odyssey-and-aeneid-essay-sample/. Published Dec 15, 2020. Accessed December 01, 2021.
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